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30 November 2011

Are we there yet?

The Yellow Bus Line operated the only land transport in South Cotabato about twenty years ago. YBL buses ply the Koronadal - Gensan - Davao route.  For long distances many South Cotabatenos preferred taking the yellow bus over those jeepneys called strikers.

A trip to Davao from Gensan would usually take 2.5 -3 hours. As a kid I remember happily observing the passing scenery or munching snacks while riding this bus with my family. If I didn't fall asleep, I was impatient, "are we there yet?"

The dust swirling around our nostrils and vision was normal. Arduous. But that was then. Now you may want to carry your tech thingies if you are on board one of their premiere buses as wifi has been enabled.

What are your buses called in your province?

Rose hosts Nostalgia.

22 November 2011

Sense and Sensibility: 200th anniversary

In 1811 Thomas Egerton of Whitehall, London published Sense and Sensibility. Quick math shows it has been two centuries since Jane Austen became a full-fledged author.

Quite an anniversary, indeed. A celebration, I declare.

Blogs regarding the publication anniversary of this romance novel picture Jane Austen's engagements whilst making the final touches of her manuscript from Sloane Street. In letters to her sister Cassandra, Jane gave accounts of her shopping for muslin, the party that their brother Henry and SIL Eliza gave; mentioned several acquaintances, and referred to her book as S and S.

As a fan I wonder which between sense and sensibility did JA deem more important since she portrayed both attributes equally well. I'm obliged to enthuse over my S & S reading experience. Alas, I only managed fourteen chapters before getting sidetracked by another novel, the very first that JA wrote. I will resume and complete my affair with the celebrant before 2011 ends.

This post is linked with ABC Wednesday.

15 November 2011

Rumford

The Rumford is a much more efficient way to heat a room than earlier fireplaces....
(Wikipedia on Benjamin Thompson, Count Rumford, designer of tall, shallow fireplaces which are now known as the Rumford, was an Anglo-American physicist known for his investigations of heat)
Living in the tropics, I have been in close proximity with only three fireplaces in my life. There was an unused one in the home of my college professor in the Philippines. The other one from which I could feel the heat and see the fire dancing was in a hotel lobby in the Yorkshire Moors. Picture taking was quick. Two old ladies were having tea by it, but that was my first ever real fireplace experience, and I loved it. The latest I have touched is the one in Jane Austen's imaginary Northanger Abbey.
The fireplace, where she had expected the ample width and ponderous carvings of former times, was contracted to a Rumford, with slabs of plain though handsome marbles, and ornament over it of the prettiest English china.
Fireplaces. What charming spots they are!


This post is linked with ABC Wednesday.

14 November 2011

Purple and white

Purple, heather, Rod Stewart with beautiful pictures to boot. The decision is unanimous :)



I couldn't shake white snake off when I checked this week's theme. Searched Youtube and found it's "White Lion." A mammal not a reptile, silly. Forgetfulness progressing. Being divorced does not keep me from liking  Til Death Do Us Part. When I saw scenes depicted in this video, I said Pride and Prejudice does it; this is it:


This post is linked with:

Denise @ Run DMT hosts Music Monday Blog Hop

10 November 2011

Q without U

These are words that begin with Q and not followed by U; in random order. Is there anything that's not new to you or have you used some in speech, writing, or word games?

1. qadi - an Islamic judge
2. qat - leaves chewed like tobacco or used to make tea
3. qabala - an esoteric or occult matter
4. qi - circulating life energy in Chinese philosophy 
5. qiang - the Tibeto-Burman language spoken in Sichuan
6. qepig - 100 qupig equal 1 manat
7. qabalistic - having a secret or hidden meaning
8. qibla - direction of the Kaaba toward which Muslims turn for daily prayers
9.  qatari - a native or inhabitant of Qatar
10. qing - the last imperial dynasty of China
11. qaid- Muslim tribal chief
12. qiviut - musk-ox wool
13. qanat - underground tunnel for irrigation

More here and on crosswordsolver.
Thanks to Megan and Janet for hosting Thursday Thirteen

08 November 2011

Quixoticism

"All the heroical fictions of ecclesiastical quixoticism"

That, claims, Wikipedia, is the first time quixoticism is mentioned, giving Pulpit Popery, True Popery as the source. Urban Dictionary defines quixoticism as unattainable idealism.

Let's take ism from quixoticism and we have quixotic. Anyone who knows Don Quixote would have an idea what the adjective is about.  Merriam Webster defines it as foolishly impractical especially in the pursuit of ideals marked by rash lofty romantic ideas or extravagantly chivalrous action.

"It doesn't do to be quixotic. Telling the truth to people who misunderstand you is really promoting falsehood." ~ Anthony Hope

Then we take ic from quixotic and finally we have quixote. Enter (drum roll please) Don Quixote of La Mancha, the windmills, skinny Rosinante, ladylove Dulcinea.... Chivalry at its quixotic best! 

"The Quixotes of this Age fight with the Wind-mills of their owne Heads"


This post is linked with ABC Wednesday.

07 November 2011

Shattered Dreams

Shattered Dreams became a hit in 1988 (US; 1987 UK).  As I was more on loving the beat I didn't pay much attention to the lyrics. Or maybe deep inside I knew the song described about 80% of what I was going through thus I avoided it. Thank goodness I'm so over 1988. Now I can dance to this tune with my two left feet.



This post is linked with:

Denise @ Run DMT hosts Music Monday Blog Hop

04 November 2011

One little guy's opinion

Last weekend my mother sent me a text describing CJ's comment on a page of a volume of his Bible Friends. It was one on the crucifixion:
This is Jesus. He said to his Father, why did you forsake me but he did not answer. Oh, what a pity to Jesus.

The wrong grammar and shaky semantics amused me. Detaching my rigid academic head off lay stuff was a learning moment. All those fine scholarly writings I encounter at work and I get to witness a child's cute opinion. Don't you just love life's bonuses?

Yesterday my mother rang. It was to worry about me and the current flood situation in Bangkok. A couple of minutes in:
CJ: (rambling in the background) I can't ride it anymore... (then butting in to address me) Mommmyyyy! why did you tie my swivel chair?

Me: Why, what did you do in church?

Am I not so deaf?! (nakakaloka ang buhay na to)


Ma then explained that she told CJ it was my order to have his swivel chair tied in a corner to prevent 'improper traffic' in the living room. With CJ's ongoing speech and occupational therapy sessions I am grateful his mind is functioning and he is behaving normally.




[caption id="attachment_7742" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="Summer watching Ultraman in a makeshift corner; he would later discover another way of riding wheels - like yesterday's incident"][/caption]

This post is linked with Mommy Moments at The Mommy Journey.

01 November 2011

Phaeton

Remember that 1995 Sense and Sensibility scene in which dashing Mr. Willoughby recklessly drives a phaeton around town with Marianne Dashwood? The novel was published in 1811.  Fast drag your imagination to 2011 and the two lovers are today's rich hunk and a happy-go-lucky, attractive chick speeding on say, a Lamborghini Reventon.

In Pride and Prejudice, obsequious Mr Collin declares, "she (Lady Catherine de Bough) is perfectly amiable, and often condescends to drive by my humble abode in her little phaeton and ponies."

pha·e·ton  (f-tn)
n.1. A light, four-wheeled open carriage, usually drawn by a pair of horses.
   2. A touring car. ( The Free Dictionary)



Two ladies in a high perch phaeton. The owners of these sporty, open-air and lightning fast carriages actually drove the vehicle, as there was no place for a coachman. Phaeton seats were built high off the ground, the sides of the vehicle were open to the elements (a top could be pulled over as a screen from sun or rain), and the back wheels were larger than the front wheels.  However, these light, airy, well-sprung vehicles were prone to tipping over when turning around corners too fast, thus a driver had to be skilled in order to move at high speed. The phaeton, therefore, was extremely popular with the rakish set. (Vic, Jane Austen's World)
This post is linked with ABC Wednesday.
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