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31 December 2012

Yule celebrations expat style, then and now

By yule, I mean the 'period extending from December 24th to January 6th.' Or January 2nd for me as I'm back to reality, a.k.a. work before all the hang-over is over.  This is the first yule in five years that I stayed put in Bangkok. No crazy wrestling of crowds at airports, no time-limited tours around exotic places in neighboring countries, just good old apartment with films, little hearty meals, music, a few international dials to communicate with family beyond the South China Sea
 
and well, one shopping that got a bit out of control. But things happen and there's always a first so while I was at one I thought I'd just forgive myself, and go feel the joys of the season. Before I tried putting up a book Christmas tree after seeing the idea from Book Riot on Facebook, yule began with routine visa and work permit renewals at Government House -

which was accomplished smoothly last year, but a bit complicated this year with a tiny irregularity spotted on a document- something between the Thai government and my employer and was quickly sorted which meant I could get on with the holidays without worrying whatever was happening to my immigration status. I kicked off celebrations with a trip to this 11000-seating capacity arena


for a night of memories induced by Candle in the Wind among many others, and sweet longing to give the kiddo a tight hug when his fave Lion King emanated from the grand

How time expands many things. And how I wish it spared the waistline

Horror of horrors: expansion is ongoing. I tried to temper that by welcoming the nephew's turn to be grounded on the piano, and coming, albeit late, to his recital. The niece, a guest performer, pleasantly shocked me with her weed-like growth. I probably should see them more often.

Meanwhile at work, there were finals to invigilate. We make do with this view from the 5th floor window - beginning stages of an offshore company party


and then to the heart of the celebrations

Disclaimer: good girls stay sober throughout yule. Countdown 2013 was as clear as these carolers resemble those in Frances May's Tuscan Christmas

The star of Siam shines on


HAPPY NEW YEAR EVERYONE!


24 December 2012

Xtemass in Buddha land

You might like this so I thought I would share. Eternal Encouragement is a magazine filled with yes, encouragement exactly, and of course many other practical tips and advice on living an abundant Christian life, with a special reference to the Christmas season.

Click here to read your first issue. Go on, it's absolutely free.
***
There is no connection between the worship of idols and the use of Christmas trees.We should not be anxious about baseless arguments against Christmas decorations. Rather, we should be focused on the Christ of Christmas and giving all diligence to remembering the real reason for the season. ~ John Macarthur

Bangkok does not lack Christmas decors in December, especially around malls. You look around and for a moment you would think you're not in a Buddhist country. Last year as I went about my normal Christmas shopping, the sight around made me think 'oh, this is just like home.'

Of course this could mainly be about the commercial side of things. But when you're far from home without family nostalgia sets in and you are grateful you have at least familiar visuals during this most wonderful time of the year.

Like the many previous Christmases, I'm alone which is not something new anymore. What's new to me is finding how and why Xmas is spelled as such. And I'm putting a few points on this post from the ever helpful Wikipedia so I do not forget:
  • it's a common abbreviation, and Xtemass, a variant, is a handwriting abbreviation. I won't be using Xtemass in writing by hand. It's more effort and more time-consuming. See it's longer.
  • the 'mas' part is an Old English word for mass 
  • "the "X" comes from the Greek letter Chi, which is the first letter of the Greek word Χριστός, translated as "Christ".
  • "that the word Xmas stems from a secular attempt to remove the religious tradition from Christmas[3] by taking the "Christ" out of "Christmas" is a common misconception
 
~ Photo ~

What history says about the use of "Xmas," I just love the ancient feel of these years:
ca. 1755 - publication year of Bernard Ward's History of St. Edmund's college, Old Hall which used "Xmas" in it's issue
ca. 1100 - the term was written as "Xp̄es mæsse" in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 
1551 - an earlier version, "X'temmas" was found
1753
- "Xmas" was found in a letter from George Woodward
1811 - Lord Byron used the term
1801 - Samuel Coleridge did too
1864 - Lewis Carroll's turn

From the not-so distant past:
1923 - America's Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. used the term in a letter. And "since at least the late 19th century, Wikipedia reports that "'Xmas' has been in use in various other English-language nations. Quotations with the word can be found in texts written in Canada, and the word has been used in Australia, and in the Caribbean."

Having served time at Bangkok U's gradschool (CommArts) where we did considerable theory, analysis and the usual paper work on Advertising, I would say Thailand may relate to Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of English Usage statement that "modern use of the term is largely limited to advertisements, headlines and banners, where its conciseness is valued."


As a Christian I'm just glad it's Christmas. It's my favorite time of the year whether I'm alone or with someone like the year before.  No matter how Buddhist Thailand is, I'm grateful for what I see when I go out of my nook and see Miss Teapot, Miss Tutti Fruity and Miss Crookshanks all resplendent in their Christmas garb -

Times are changing indeed in the kingdom. December 2000 I had to be at work. Two years and a decade later, that is no longer the case and I can't tell you how happy and grateful I am for this reversal of fortune. Christmas it is! Buddha land transforms into Xtemass Wonderland!





18 December 2012

Whittard of Chelsea


Whittard of Chelsea is one of Bangkok's many tea rooms. Walter Whittard founded Whittard of Chelsea in 1886. The first Whittard shop is said to have opened in London and then moved to Chelsea. That's probably how of Chelsea came to be part of the full name. They have several branches in Thailand. Life Center lists seven in Bangkok. I'm not sure if there might be a few more in cities where tourists flock like Pattaya, Huahin, Chiangmai or Phuket.  This branch a friend and I went to is in Siam Paragon. We didn't plan on relaxing here. It just happened to be right in front of us when we felt like having tea so in we went. Now I remember how comfy being seated in here was compared to that place I recently went to.


Ah, here comes the Waitress of Whittard -


I didn't keep track of who ordered what. My best guess is that the praline and Moroccan mint are mine, while my friend had banana and carrot cupcake. She probably paired it with peppermint. We talked about approaching 40 and how fun aging beautifully could be. We tease each other 'old maid.' Now it looks like the title can be official. Old Maid, i.e. can't remember what we ate and drank.

But I do remember I loved the ambience.

17 December 2012

Chocolate mint ice cream

When I ordered ice cream at a big lunch I hosted in 2004 for (m/l) 300 family and friends at my father's funeral reception, I also wondered how it was made. I like to have an idea of how something I'm eating came to be. The recipe I'm sharing comes from Rita on Food: Home of the Home Cook.

She says her son likes chocolate mint ice cream and she made this for his birthday. In the meantime I can only buy scoops for my son and for a slightly different reason - to bribe him to eat veggies. The plan though is to try this recipe myself when things at work calm down.

Ingredients:
2 ounces unsweetened cocoa powder, approximately 1/2 cup
3 cups half-and-half
1 cup heavy cream
8 large egg yolks
9 ounces sugar
2 teaspoons pure mint extract
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Directions:

Place the cocoa powder along with 1 cup of the half-and-half into a medium saucepan over medium heat and whisk to combine.

Add the remaining half-and-half and the heavy cream. Bring the mixture just to a simmer, stirring occasionally, and remove from the heat.

In a medium mixing bowl whisk the egg yolks until they lighten in color. Gradually add the sugar and whisk to combine.

Temper the cream mixture by stirring cream into the eggs and sugar by gradually adding small amounts, until about third of the cream mixture has been added. Whisk in the remainder and return the entire mixture to the saucepan and place over low heat. Continue to cook, stirring frequently, until the mixture thickens slightly and coats the back of a spoon and reaches 170 to 175 degrees F. Pour the mixture into a container and allow to sit at room temperature to cool for 30 minutes. Stir in the mint extract and vanilla extract. Place the mixture into the refrigerator and once it is cool enough not to form condensation on the lid, Cover and store for 4 to 8 hours or until the temperature reaches 40 degrees F or below.

Pour into an ice cream maker and process according to the manufacturer's directions. This should take approximately 25 to 35 minutes. Serve as is for soft serve or freeze for another 3 to 4 hours to allow the ice cream to harden.

Rewind to (circa) 1989
Miss Rallos, a vintage, fat old maid, very strict you don't want to cross her, was the manager of the dormitory I lived in when I was in boarding college.  My  roommates and  I would queue up for her signature on our clearance slips before we could take final exams.  Once my turn was about five girls ahead; I made use of the time observing things in her lair...err...kitchen. On the wall near the bathroom there was this picture poster of a mommy koala and her baby looking cheeky. I still memorize what it said, and I'm using the words nowadays to make a little story of how the kiddo is so difficult to feed. 


Fast forward to 2008
This chocolate mint ice cream was actually my choice, not the kiddo's. At first he was timid about it. I introduced him to some of life's sweetest things by telling him a story about how that pretty nun Mommy saw in Dalby Forest (England) ate an ice cream just like this one. This was also his reward for trying to eat salad during lunch earlier. By the time he finished eating, the melting ice cream had dripped from his little fingers down to his elbow and soaked his shirt, and I found out I had no more Kleenex in my purse so we rushed home by taking the sky train.

12 December 2012

Vintage Passion



It's been awhile since I decided to love vintage. And awhile since I've been reading about it comparing definitions, descriptions and illustrations as I know I most likely will not know how to distinguish vintage from antique just by looking. The first definition I read of vintage refers to wine, and as an adjective that means high quality, as in vintage claret. The Urban Dictionary defines vintage as "too old to be considered modern, but not old enough to be considered antique." There's vintage clothing which, according to Wikipedia, "is a generic term for new or second hand garments originating from a previous era." There's also vintage fashion which is "clothing and accessories that are at least 25 years old, and as, according to ATELIER-MAYER, "vintage fashion is now coveted the world over, it can be as little as two season's ago." There is also vintage furniture which is "furniture between 30 and 100 years old."

While roaming Central World, I was happily drawn to a store called Vintage Passion. Items for sale there are my kind of things to furnish a house with. Now I'm not really keen on the age as long as the look looks vintage to me - fine by me as this earring is, which I never wear but once.


Girls checking out guys, vintage style. If there is such a thing as vintage behavior.


05 December 2012

Red glasses at the White House



The can't-shut-up version: Two friends were seated in front of us. We were waiting for the little guy's dinner to arrive, in a colonial-looking restaurant called White House. I've forgotten what I ordered for him but it was most likely chicken as it's his favorite dish morning, noon, and night. We were on a weekend holiday in Lopburi, a charming historical town about an hour by bus from Bangkok. I love ruins and history museums and this was one of those trips.

Umbel

Umbel is "a mass of flowers springing from a single center." (The Phrontistery) The Science Dictionary defines it as "a flat or rounded indeterminate inflorescence in which the individual flower stalks (called pedicels) arise from about the same point on the stem at the tip of the peduncle." Umbel is a new-to-me word. I'm marking a few things I learned about it:

  • the flowers at the center of inflorescence are the youngest
  • the lower of outer flowers bloom first
  • geranium, milkweed and onion have umbels
  • umbels come from latin umbella, meaning a sunshade (does 'umbrella' come to mind?)

I thought I would skip this week's U word, until I looked around to find examples of umbels and found a photo to show. As lantanas mature they change color "resulting in inflorescences (group or cluster of flowers on a stem) that are two- or three-colored." I found these lantanas along a pavement in a memorial park; I was visiting my father's grave in the Philippines
 

And these are lantanas along a pavement too, in Bangkok. I noticed them on my way to work one morning.
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