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Showing posts with label Jane Austen. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Jane Austen. Show all posts

12 December 2012

Vintage Passion



It's been awhile since I decided to love vintage. And awhile since I've been reading about it comparing definitions, descriptions and illustrations as I know I most likely will not know how to distinguish vintage from antique just by looking. The first definition I read of vintage refers to wine, and as an adjective that means high quality, as in vintage claret. The Urban Dictionary defines vintage as "too old to be considered modern, but not old enough to be considered antique." There's vintage clothing which, according to Wikipedia, "is a generic term for new or second hand garments originating from a previous era." There's also vintage fashion which is "clothing and accessories that are at least 25 years old, and as, according to ATELIER-MAYER, "vintage fashion is now coveted the world over, it can be as little as two season's ago." There is also vintage furniture which is "furniture between 30 and 100 years old."

While roaming Central World, I was happily drawn to a store called Vintage Passion. Items for sale there are my kind of things to furnish a house with. Now I'm not really keen on the age as long as the look looks vintage to me - fine by me as this earring is, which I never wear but once.


Girls checking out guys, vintage style. If there is such a thing as vintage behavior.


24 January 2012

A fire was in my head

In this post: Teaser, Top Ten, Tune In

Teasers:


She had resolved that one and twenty should be the period.  With the fortitude of a devoted noviciate, she had resolved to complete the sacrifice, and retire from all the pleasures of life, of rational intercourse, equal society, peace and hope, to penance and mortification forever.

p. 423, "Emma" by Jane Austen (Volume II, Collected Edition)

A classic look at misconstrued romance. Foolish, arrogant, sensible, oblivious or endearing characters are excellently portrayed. If you've read this before, marvel anew at how people from way way back are actually alike ourselves nowadays in many ways.  If not, get ready to observe human behavior described with humor and skill that made Jane Austen a much-loved author with millions of fans.

*Teaser Tuesdays is hosted by MizB at Should Be Reading
Top Ten: Books I Can't Believe I've Never Read

Perhaps easy accessibility was taken for granted. But there's no excuse for not having read #6, especially for someone like me who did grad time in the Humanities- Communication Arts no less. This reading life is stranger than fiction.

1. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
2. Anne Shirley of Green Gables by LM Montgomery
3. Purpose Driven Life by Rick Warren
4. Catcher in the Rye by JD Salinger
5. Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
6. Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell
7. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
8. Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
9. Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
10. Angela's Ashes by Frank McCourt

*Top Ten Tuesday is hosted by The Broke and the Bookish
Tune In : Song of Wandering Aengus

There's a new kind of fun around here - exploring literary works, especially classical poetry set into music.  Here's one I found:

Lyrics from a poem of the same title by W.B. Yeats
Vocals by Donovan & Video illustration by Sissham

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQUT6mS0eY8[/youtube]
*Tune in Tuesday is hosted by Ginger at GReads!

Please leave your permalink so I can check it out.

22 November 2011

Sense and Sensibility: 200th anniversary

In 1811 Thomas Egerton of Whitehall, London published Sense and Sensibility. Quick math shows it has been two centuries since Jane Austen became a full-fledged author.

Quite an anniversary, indeed. A celebration, I declare.

Blogs regarding the publication anniversary of this romance novel picture Jane Austen's engagements whilst making the final touches of her manuscript from Sloane Street. In letters to her sister Cassandra, Jane gave accounts of her shopping for muslin, the party that their brother Henry and SIL Eliza gave; mentioned several acquaintances, and referred to her book as S and S.

As a fan I wonder which between sense and sensibility did JA deem more important since she portrayed both attributes equally well. I'm obliged to enthuse over my S & S reading experience. Alas, I only managed fourteen chapters before getting sidetracked by another novel, the very first that JA wrote. I will resume and complete my affair with the celebrant before 2011 ends.

This post is linked with ABC Wednesday.

15 November 2011

Rumford

The Rumford is a much more efficient way to heat a room than earlier fireplaces....
(Wikipedia on Benjamin Thompson, Count Rumford, designer of tall, shallow fireplaces which are now known as the Rumford, was an Anglo-American physicist known for his investigations of heat)
Living in the tropics, I have been in close proximity with only three fireplaces in my life. There was an unused one in the home of my college professor in the Philippines. The other one from which I could feel the heat and see the fire dancing was in a hotel lobby in the Yorkshire Moors. Picture taking was quick. Two old ladies were having tea by it, but that was my first ever real fireplace experience, and I loved it. The latest I have touched is the one in Jane Austen's imaginary Northanger Abbey.
The fireplace, where she had expected the ample width and ponderous carvings of former times, was contracted to a Rumford, with slabs of plain though handsome marbles, and ornament over it of the prettiest English china.
Fireplaces. What charming spots they are!


This post is linked with ABC Wednesday.

01 November 2011

Phaeton

Remember that 1995 Sense and Sensibility scene in which dashing Mr. Willoughby recklessly drives a phaeton around town with Marianne Dashwood? The novel was published in 1811.  Fast drag your imagination to 2011 and the two lovers are today's rich hunk and a happy-go-lucky, attractive chick speeding on say, a Lamborghini Reventon.

In Pride and Prejudice, obsequious Mr Collin declares, "she (Lady Catherine de Bough) is perfectly amiable, and often condescends to drive by my humble abode in her little phaeton and ponies."

pha·e·ton  (f-tn)
n.1. A light, four-wheeled open carriage, usually drawn by a pair of horses.
   2. A touring car. ( The Free Dictionary)



Two ladies in a high perch phaeton. The owners of these sporty, open-air and lightning fast carriages actually drove the vehicle, as there was no place for a coachman. Phaeton seats were built high off the ground, the sides of the vehicle were open to the elements (a top could be pulled over as a screen from sun or rain), and the back wheels were larger than the front wheels.  However, these light, airy, well-sprung vehicles were prone to tipping over when turning around corners too fast, thus a driver had to be skilled in order to move at high speed. The phaeton, therefore, was extremely popular with the rakish set. (Vic, Jane Austen's World)
This post is linked with ABC Wednesday.

23 March 2011

Jane Austen

It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single woman in possession of a Jane Austen addiction must be in want of more Jane Austen adaptations - Hazel, Delineating Des
 Jane Austen
16 December 1775 - 18 July 1817
an English novelist whose works of romantic fiction, set among the landed gentry earned her a place as one of the most widely read writers in English literature, her realism and biting social commentary cementing her historical importance among scholars and critics. - Wikipedia

Among ABC Wednesday players I doubt a Jane Austen needs much introduction. Even less known facts about her must not be much surprise to many of you. But forgive me I couldn't resist.

Bride and Prejudice, Tents and Tentsability, Fried and Pre-juiced Dishes, the book clubs, the blogs, the societies, and many more are a testament to her popularity.
As a fan working in the Education industry and trained in research, my readings about Jane Austen, tilt towards the literary criticism side of her works.  That besides all other JA-related things, is endless fun. As this burlesque is:

No Sense, No Sensibility
 
This post is linked with ABC Wednesday.

26 March 2010

Hazel-eyed Jane Austen


As a fan of Jane Austen, I am extremely pleased with the plethora of information about her on the web. It goes without saying that I spend hours immersed in Austen blogs and equally delightful related sites. There is one I want to focus on, and it is the source of my faves this week:

Sadish

Jane Austen's World
A classic party inside! I am drawn to this promise:

"This blog brings Jane Austen, her novels, and the Regency Period alive through food, dress, social customs, and other 19th C. historical details"

A good trait
Vic, the blog owner writes on "About Me"

"...If you would like to share a new site, or point out an error, please email me. (Yes, I am fallible. I'll own up to my mistakes and will make the corrections with a polite smile on my face.)"


A familiar word
It's an adjective but it's also my name. James Austen Leigh, the author's nephew describes his aunt's physical attributes -

“ ... full round cheeks, with mouth and nose small and well formed, light hazel eyes, and brown hair forming natural curls close round her face.”

Jane Austen: Christian Encounters by Peter Leithart
There are many Austen publications and reviews out there, but this is the first time I saw one of a book written by a christian pastor and Austen scholar at the same time. What magnets me to this review is Vic's closing comment which mirrors an inclination I have for someone with whom I have a volatile relationship: my own mother whose moral beliefs and practices often clash with mine -

"The references to Jane’s religion and Christian beliefs were interwoven into the narrative in an unobtrusive and restrained way. I had feared a lecture; what I received was enlightenment and a book I shall share with my Christian mother who is always asking me: “What is it about Jane Austen that makes you such as devotee?” Read this book, Mama, and you will understand."

Regency wedding dresses
I must be the only divorcee who is still crazy about wedding dresses lol! Ok, not exactly crazy but perhaps a better phrase would be 'like anyway and no matter what'. Admiring vintage fashion is high on my bucket. This Jane Austen's World post, as well as Social Customs During the Regency Era contain a rich list of links. Before I go hyper I think I should pause with this quote Vic included to celebrate a niece's wedding

"The handsome veil of Mechlin lace, A sister’s love bestows, It adds new beauties to her face, Which now with pleasure glows. Friends brothers sisters cousins meet, To attend the happy bride, And Queer’s joy is all complete, The nuptial knot is tied -"


Share what you love about your week with Susanne at Living to Tell the Story

25 March 2010

Palimpsest


Bucolic is listed on Dr Goodword's alphaDictionary as one of the most beautiful words in English. I typed it on google images and as I strayed, like I usually allow myself to when leisurely searching, I was led to words that reflect concepts appealing to me:



1. eclogue
2. denouement

3. cynosure
4. pianoforte

5. palimpsest
6. onomatopoeia

7. riparian
8. inglenook

9. petrichor
10. lilt

11. arcadian
12. vintage

13. Jenny what else but my idol Jane Austen's nickname :-)


Share your Thursday Thirteen list with Megan and Janet.

11 February 2010

Austenuating Jane Austen

Two weeks ago I wrote an essay in a bid for a PhD slot in a university in the southwestern pacific. Just when I was about to send it over, I realized that if I were offered a place, the very topic I built a case on would send me back to Thailand for data-gathering. I didn't fancy that and decided to work on something that will keep me afloat should I face drudgery at some point in the research. Since I have always been a fan of a rector's daughter who was a writing machine at a time when a king's son ruled England, I happily spent hours breezing through massive literature on her. Jane Austen, the name that could launch a thousand nights of delightful observations.

Except for the titles in bold font, I listed them according to how they appear on Literary History. They should help me nail an idea on how to proceed with brainstorming later. If I ever change my mind about the unfinished essay yet again or even abandon PhD for some reason, I know I won't regret the pleasure of this reading experience:

1. Ascarelli, Miriam. "A Feminist Connection: Jane Austen and Mary Wollstonecraft." Persuasions 25 (2004).

2. DeForest, Mary and Eric Johnson. "Computing Latinate Word Usage in Jane Austen's Novels." A description of a computer-aided study developed to identify the use of Latinate language by characters in Jane Austen. Computers and Text (2000).

3. Graham, Peter W. "Born to Diverge: An Evolutionary Perspective on Sibling Personality Development in Austen's Novels." Persuasions 25 (2004).

4. Graves, David Andrew. "Vocabulary Profiles of Letters and Novels of Jane Austen and her Contemporaries." Persuasions 26 (2005).

5. McCawley, Dwight. "Assertion and Aggression in the Novels of Jane Austen." McCawley makes use of the distinction between assertion and aggression from popular books on "assertiveness training" to discuss Austen's characters. Persuasions 11 (1989).

6. Nelles, William. "Omniscience for atheists: or, Jane Austen's infallible narrator." Narrative (2006). On the comparison of the narrator to God.

7. Zunshine, Lisa. "Why Jane Austen was different, and why we may need cognitive science to see it." Style (2007).

8. Ellwood, Gracia Fay. "'Such a Dead Silence:' Cultural Evil, Challenge, Deliberate Evil, and Metanoia in Mansfield Park." Persuasions 24 (2003).

9. Duckworth, W. "Reading Emma: Comic Irony, the Follies of Janeites, and Hermeneutic Mastery." Persuasions 24 (2003).

10. Gilbert, Deirdre E. "'Willy-Nilly' and Other Tales of Male-Tails: Rightful and Wrongful Laws of Landed Property in Northanger Abbey and Beyond." Persuasions 20 (1999).

11. Jones, Susan E. "Thread-cases, Pin-cushions, and Card-racks: Women's Work in the City in Jane Austen's Persuasion." Persuasions 25 (2004).

12. Rytting, Jenny Rebecca. "Jane Austen Meets Carl Jung: Pride, Prejudice, and Personality Theory." Persuasions 22 (2001).

13. Dinkler, Michal Beth. "Speaking of Silence: Speech and Silence as a Subversive Means of Power in Jane Austen's Sense and Sensibility." Persuasions 25 (2004).


Megan and Janet host
header by Samulli; click here for more lists

05 February 2010

Regency delight and love language

Friday's Fave Five: Regency Period Cake
Please scroll down for Mommy Moments

Ambience of Banana Leaf
Restaurant dinners continue to be the trend for us this week. Rustic charm has always been a big hit to me and Banana Leaf's got it. Buckets of real wheat, garlic and pumpkin hang adorning the wall. Plus the sweet and sour fish and chicken with cashew nuts and mushroom are a real pleasure.

J Lo Live
This was a gift to me two years ago. Cj is too young to be choosy with scents. He smiles playfully when I spray it on him and I laugh inwardly thinking he is a boy wearing a girl's perfume. This week we both smell the same :)

Cyberbanking
I finally dragged documents and myself down K Bank to register for online financial transactions. Spending only what I earn suits me best as I avoid debts and the convenience of sorting expenses any time of day in familiar surrounding is always welcome.

Music in the air
Whatever happened to the PA system at work? An old song was coming off it this morning. The sound led my eyes to the open gym where members of the ballroom dancing club were practising slow dance steps to You Needed Me. It was an auditory treat to think that this PA normally trumpets off announcements like "those who have INCs in Taxation 101 please proceed to...."

Regency period delight
I browsed sites about Jane Austen, one of my favorite authors, and found this very delightful thing. The post includes instructions on how to create it. Although I'm not baking anytime soon nor am I a huge cake eater, I'm blown by the loveliness of the idea that one day I will come up with this thing of beauty on my table.

Susanne hostsYou can read more faves at Living to Tell the Story

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Mommy Moments: Love Language
Please scroll up for Friday's Fave Five


Based on Chris's Thursday post about love language as described by Gary Chapman, this is how Cj and I communicate our love to each other:

Words of Affirmation. People need to hear compliments. Simple "thank you" or "you look wonderful today" is important to this people.

Cj always says, "Thank you Mommy" everytime I give him his milk. I also say "I love you, Baby Pooh" constantly, besides affirmative adjectives when he shows me his drawings (eventhough I look like a dinosaur most of the time) or shapes he forms from his blocks.

Once in the Philippines I was curious as to who Cj was playing with outside the house so I went to check. As soon as he noticed me, he stopped playing, put his hand on the back of my legs (that's all he could reach at the age of 2) and addressed his playmates, "My Mommy." At first I didn't realize that he was introducing me to his friends, but when I did, I thought I just experienced one of life's greatest pleasures!

Acts of Service. People receive love through acts of service like fixing the bed, preparing a meal for them or doing a chore for them.

Now that I'm taking care of Cj singlehandedly, I get to do what I never did when a caregiver was around. I would be lying if I said that on top of my official duties outside the home, domestic chores do not tire me. They certainly wear me down but when Cj does what I ask him to do like, "turn off the light, please;" "hand me the spoon, please;" "go to the computer, Ceej and please play a movie," I am thrilled and ready to face another day.

Physical Touch. People need to be hugged, touched, or sit close together.

Cj gets this love in abundance; he responds well.

Receiving Gifts. People need to receive thoughtful, not necessarily expensive, gifts.

Check.

Quality Time. People equate love with spending time with them like listening to them, walking, talking and the likes.

*sigh* As a working single mom quality time seems to be my shortcoming. But I'm working on improving the situation.


Chris hosts

Click here for more love language

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