Dyslexics and Developmental Pediatricians

Let me begin with an observation on the latter.  Developmental pediatricians in the Philippines are a rare breed. Or that's what I noticed. From society and organization websites, to forums, to word-of-mouth, to my own experience, they seem to be outnumbered by people who need their expertise. A parent of a child with developmental delays has to wait weeks or months to see one developmental pediatrician.


Only thirty are listed on the Philippine Society of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. Twenty-five in one Filipino autism blog, and that is not purely DevPeds. A child psychologist, child psychiatrist, and pediatric neurologist are mixed in the list, although they certainly are a big help too.


At my son's speech therapy and psychology center I hear the same account from other parents - securing a time slot with a DevPed is hard. They are all fully booked throughout what could turn into a year. You may be lucky if someone withdraws but that rarely happens.


I'm playing this by ear: I guess the picture is different in the west where for every special problem there always seems to be a corresponding expert. The perk of advance knowledge. Advance research. Wealth.


Back then I never heard of DevPeds or children with developmental issues were just undiagnosed. Recalling those years in the grades there were indeed a few who could have benefited from relative specialists. There was this practice among elementary school teachers, of assigning a child who knows well ahead to tutor a classmate who is behind lessons. Poor Christina. She would shed tears of frustration as she struggled with simple phrases. And poor me.  I would frown in exasperation as I sat with her wondering why she crawled through sentences.


Dyslexic? I hope at least now Christina doesn't mind being in glamorous company. There are more than rare of them, like some listed on dyslexia the gift site list.


Among actors and entertainers: Whoopi Goldberg and Keanu Reeves
Among inventors and scientists: Alexander Graham Bell and Pierre Currie
Among artists and designers: Leonardo da Vinci and Tommy Hilfiger
Among athletes and political leaders: Muhammad Ali and John F. Kennedy
Among entrepreneurs and business leaders: Richard Branson and Ted Turner
Among writers and journalists: Agatha Christie and Byron Pitts

Here's looking forward to third world DevPeds becoming as less and less rare as dyslexics around the rest of the world are famous contributing members of global society.


ABC Wednesday         

Comments

  1. Its a shame that more kids aren't getting the help they need. Alternative ways of learning can be the only way for some children to overcome the problems. It looks like Christina is in good company.

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  2. I hope the staffing of the specialty increases in your land.
    ROG, ABC Wednesday team

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  3. I almost wrote about dyslexia...It seems that research is supporting the fact that dyslexics are usually VERY creative thinkers and artists - which further supports your list!

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  4. When I went to school and had difficulties, nobody didn't even know what Dyslexic meant. It was only when my son was 10 and had also some problems at school, that I realized that we both were dyslexic. He could be treated, (it just had been discovered as a disease), but I still mix up left with right and other little things especially numbers. But I am used to it after so many years and it didn't cause me any harm in my professional career.
    Gattina
    ABC Wednesday

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  5. Very interesting post and well written. Carver, ABC Wednesday Team

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  6. Superb Post and very informative... thanks for sharing..

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  7. not only rare, but they are expensive too, P3k to 5k for PF

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  8. Our medical and psychiatric department in the Philippines even seem hopeless to people who can't afford them. Lucky are those who can and can get through the appointments.

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  9. Law of supply and demand.

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  10. The picture is getting scarier, isn't it? Makes me grateful my only problem is rarity.

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  11. Sad, but the reality bites! I wish you'll have the opportunity to come here and get your son his deserved services - without the need to wait!!!

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  12. It's okay. My son is in good hands; gets all the doctors he needs. I was only pointing out the scarcity of DevPeds in the Philippines but thanks for the good wishes.

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  13. Lucky for those how can afford and unlucky for those you can't. <-- In the Philippines. Different picture <-- In the west BOTH ARE TRUE AND CORRECT!. I wish all the best for you and your kid.

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  14. This is so informative, I hope that the number of DevPed will increase.

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  15. Our government should take into consideration things like this especially those in the health field.

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  16. Right on Jade. Just the thought I'd like to hear.

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  17. I don't mind being dyslexic if I am as handsome and as famous as Keannu Reeves...lol... :)

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  18. Hmm.. Siguro kelangan din tong bigyang pansin ng government natin, since padami na ata ang merong ganito, at pamahal din ng bayad sa mga sessions. I had a classmate nung gradeschool, he had dyslexia. Nahihirapan talaga sya, pero kahit na ganun, he's very determined to learn, and also smart. He graduaed with honors..

    Tom Cruise has dyslexia, too.. I think.

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  19. Thanks for sharing this one. I don't know if my parents knew this but I was also a Dyslexic unconsciously that at times, I see and read things differently.

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  20. That was a sad true on your post, if one needs an specialist you need to wait first and how about those who cannot afford, all we can do is to rely on family support and unconditional love

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  21. i have an autistic niece. the problem is limited schools offering special education for these special kids. sana mapagtuunan ng pansin ng government sayang naman sila, these kids deserves more in life..

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  22. Your observation is true, many kids with problems like this are not given the right attention and care. Although there are schools who have brilliant programs to respond to these needs, it is just the wealthy ones who can afford and the less fortunate just contained within them the desire to get the attention.

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  23. I've watched this Hindi movie entitled Every Child is a star and it is basically a story about a kid who is deslyxic. I was so surprised that there are a lot of famous people suffering the same trouble.

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  24. first time I've heard of a Developmental Pediatrician... I kinda thought that all Pediatricians are the same... well, it's always good to know things like this...

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