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13 September 2013

A doily arbitrates

Does anyone remember those doilies?


This doily is one of the oldest things we have at home; kept among pins, spools of thread, lace and other little old things around my mother's equally old Singer sewing machine. I needed to take a photo of my recent bookstore loot with Lady Anastasia before I was to fly back to Thailand. Something was necessary between her ceramic ladyship and Mama's glass table to prevent clashes or scratches. This doily served that purpose perfectly.
ae Nak, a native of Phra Khanong, marries the handsome Mak. When war breaks out, Mak is conscripted for military service and leaves his pregnant wife behind.
In the war, Mak is severely wounded. Meanwhile, Mae Nak dies during childbirth with her unborn child and is buried by the neighbors. This is unusual as Buddhist custom calls for the cremation of their dead.
When Mak recovers from his injuries, he returns home to an emotional reunion with his loving wife and baby son, not realizing what has happened.
Neighbors who try to warn him meet with a grisly end. Things remained this way until he discovers that he's actually living with the ghost of his wife!
He flees but she pursues him and the romance turns to horror. Mak seeks refuge in Wat Mahabut but Mae Nak follows him there. After several attempts by the terrified villagers, Mae Nak is finally exorcised to return to the other world and leaves Mak alone.
- See more at: http://www.tour-bangkok-legacies.com/wat-mahabut.html#sthash.xwgvkf7o.dpuf
Mae Nak, a native of Phra Khanong, marries the handsome Mak. When war breaks out, Mak is conscripted for military service and leaves his pregnant wife behind.
In the war, Mak is severely wounded. Meanwhile, Mae Nak dies during childbirth with her unborn child and is buried by the neighbors. This is unusual as Buddhist custom calls for the cremation of their dead.
When Mak recovers from his injuries, he returns home to an emotional reunion with his loving wife and baby son, not realizing what has happened.
Neighbors who try to warn him meet with a grisly end. Things remained this way until he discovers that he's actually living with the ghost of his wife!
He flees but she pursues him and the romance turns to horror. Mak seeks refuge in Wat Mahabut but Mae Nak follows him there. After several attempts by the terrified villagers, Mae Nak is finally exorcised to return to the other world and leaves Mak alone.
- See more at: http://www.tour-bangkok-legacies.com/wat-mahabut.html#sthash.xwgvkf7o.dpuf
Mae Nak, a native of Phra Khanong, marries the handsome Mak. When war breaks out, Mak is conscripted for military service and leaves his pregnant wife behind.
In the war, Mak is severely wounded. Meanwhile, Mae Nak dies during childbirth with her unborn child and is buried by the neighbors. This is unusual as Buddhist custom calls for the cremation of their dead.
When Mak recovers from his injuries, he returns home to an emotional reunion with his loving wife and baby son, not realizing what has happened.
Neighbors who try to warn him meet with a grisly end. Things remained this way until he discovers that he's actually living with the ghost of his wife!
He flees but she pursues him and the romance turns to horror. Mak seeks refuge in Wat Mahabut but Mae Nak follows him there. After several attempts by the terrified villagers, Mae Nak is finally exorcised to return to the other world and leaves Mak alone.
- See more at: http://www.tour-bangkok-legacies.com/wat-mahabut.html#sthash.xwgvkf7o.dpuf

13 comments:

  1. Yes, I remember such doilies. I have several that have been passed down to me. I'm sure there was a rule that you HAD to own several.

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    1. I didn't know that. But that's probably why my mother does own several although I think this is the only one that has survived through the years. I'm glad she still has it.

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  2. I didn't think of doilies - I have quite a few made by my Nanna and her sister. I must get them out and photograph some. Thanks for reminding me.

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  3. The dolly is new to me but not a Singer sewing machine.

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  4. I love how the doily abritrates between the two hard surfaces.

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  5. I love doilies, I still use them whenever I can.

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  6. The doily is the "star" of that photo (in more ways than one).

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  7. That is one intricate doily.

    My blog was very nearly about the many doilies I have but instead I chose the handkerchief. Very glad now.

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  8. Of course I do. Funny true story, once a friend of mine told me when she roomed with a girl not from Minnesota, and this girl actually took the real live pieces of Lefsa that had been mailed from her grandmother and placed them around the house as if they were doilies! Too funny!

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  9. oh, how could I not think of photographing my doilies? I wouldn't use doilies when I was a modern-day bride. But now...I look for them at flea markets and shops which carry vintage wares.

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  10. Like other bloggers I have a number of such doilies crocheted or knitted by old rellies - and even by me. Thanks for sharing yours.

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  11. Yes I remember those - I've even blogged about them. i've kept one of the many made by my grandmother too.

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  12. We have a lot of doilies that came from so many relatives and one friend. My mom loved to crochet and sing or hum as she created them. Her most ugly doily was one made from black yarn with silver sparkles in it. Ugh.

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